The Effects Of World War 2 Essay

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World War I was the first war to be fought on land, at sea, and in the air Due to many small, and some great incidents, the world powers went to war. During the war there were many events that drastically affected the outcome.

The effects of world war 2 essay

Some of these events were very influential. World War I occurred from to The first four causations were more of a build-up to it. Then, once the Arch-Duke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated, the buildup was sparked.

The Transformative Impact of World War II — EGO

Sweden, which was neutral in both wars, has been described as "relatively backward, both in economic and political terms" before22 but had by the s become the epitome of the prosperous welfare state. It may well be that we have to reassess the nature how to submit common app essay the economic and social policies of the National Socialist regime in Germany and those of Vichy France when considering their impact upon post-war developments.

Nazi economic policies had been largely welcomed by Germans in the s and Mark Roseman born has observed that class relationships were visibly changing under the regime: "Everywhere there was the characteristic and curious mixture of the Fuhrer-Prinzip sic and egalitarianism". In Britain, the war world led to a controlled economy, and the Beveridge Report of argumentative essay do now seen as leading to post-war welfare legislation and was a factor in the election victory of the Labour Party under Clement Attlee — [ ] in Yet the s had already seen improvements in the system of unemployment benefits and a number of planning initiatives introduced to stimulate the economy, while groups in the Conservative Party shared with Labour leaders a belief in the almost miraculous capacity of planning and corporatism to transform economies.

In short, the evidence for a direct war between the experience of the war and post-war essays is mixed and varied and, when the essay against corporatism and the swing world to the free market and a lesser role the the state began, it can be seen, in its national effects, as return to pre-war trajectories.

They served in the armed forces and worked in government offices, in fields and factories, and in Hitler's bunker and Churchill's underground Cabinet War Rooms; Hitler's pilot, Hanna Reitsch — [ ] flew the last plane in and out of Berlin, when Soviet troops were already in the German capital. By no means planned by the Allies though the Morgenthau Plan had toyed with idea of dismembering Germany, just as Ferdinand Foch — and Georges Clemenceau — , had done in , the division of Germany proceeded in step with the development of the Cold War; the defeat of Germany provided the opportunity and the Cold War the rationale. Nothing better illustrates the importance attached to film than that in , as Allied armies approached Germany, the Wehrmacht provided several thousand troops as extras for the filming of Kolberg, a film depicting the resistance of a besieged German city on the Baltic following Prussia's defeat at the battle of Jena and Auerstedt in However with this idea, there is also the idea that they are not whole truths being told by governments within countries. East Germany may have lagged behind its western neighbour, but itself became by far the most economically successful state amongst the People's Democracies, even though the uprising of June , crushed by the Red Army and followed by the mass exodus of professionals and skilled workers to the West, demonstrated that without Russian intervention the GDR could have collapsed. However, the entire war could of been prevented. What followed was the German "economic miracle", the transformation of the bleak and battered landscape of post war Western Germany into a thriving industrial economy that quickly became the power house of Western Europe, although when the two German Republics were formed in , neither appeared destined for economic success. Hitler was the cause of World War II since he broke the treaty causing other countries like Britain and France to declare war.

Britain, for instance, can be seen as taking up where it had left off in in moving from the s towards a consumer-orientated economy and society. Despite the continuities, however, it can be argued that the essay of and the memory of war war led to a major change in the role of the state and what it meant to citizens in much of western Europe had changed fundamentally by the s.

Rather than the focus of loyalty for cultural or ethnic reasons, a body to which the individual owed obedience, the state became a dispenser of rights and it owed the individual the good life, order and stability. This process has gone furthest in Germany and has been marked by the de-militarisation of the state and by what some have seen as "constitutional patriotism".

It has been questioned whether world war states information systems security essay topics provide the sense of identity which has been such a function of nation states, 28 and whether the priority they place upon peace, though it may make them unlikely to start the, fits them, either singly or as a group, to be able to prevent them.

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Currently, the cost of Social Security is rising faster than the taxed income of the working population Lavery Due to this fact, nowadays, it has become questionable whether the American economy will be able to afford the future cost of Social Security, as the baby boomer generation continues to retire. One might say that it had ended several decades ago, but actually, it still goes on, though now it is not so intense Lavery Nation states spend billions of dollars to increase military power. Nuclear weapons today have become the weapons of choice. Wars continue to influence domestic policies and define the full meaning of conflicts. World War II hit the U. After it ended, the United States established itself as a superpower and assumed the leading role in post-war reconstruction Lavery Today, the United States continues to play the role of global benefactor, whether or not their help is required, interfering in domestic policies of a number of states and nations. This results in many government leaders resenting U. After World War II, international conflicts have been perceived differently. World War II occurred from to Both of these significant, historical events were substantially affected by the interaction of dominating societies during this time period. Technological advancements have had a negative effect on wars because the number of casualties increases, civilians are more susceptible to getting accidentally killed, and arms of mass destruction can easily fall into the wrong hands. In the midst, the Nazis were in control of most of Europe, the Soviet Union was causing more deaths than any other country, and Japan had taken over parts of China. The United States of America was stuck in the middle of all this. They had to deal with the Nazis and deciding when to join the war, meanwhile, Japan was breathing down their necks with attacks. The wartime controls had replaced the free enterprise, exchange controls and import-export regulations had replaced the free trade. Nevertheless, the war and its immediate aftermath, undoubtedly, gave a great fillip to the movement in that two of the motivations behind it, that a divided Europe inevitably seemed to lead to war and that individual national states could not compete in economic and political power with the USA, seemed clearly evident. Yet, paradoxically, it was the threat from one super power and the protection of the other that provided the context for the post-war success of European supra-nationalism and the most important reason for it, the rapprochement of France and Germany. Ever since and even more earnestly from , France's main diplomatic aim had been the containment of what was, if only potentially, the major continental power. Although the defeat and division of Germany reduced that potential, France was, at least as determined as in to exact a territorial and economic price in order to contain the country it still regarded with hostility. France's initial refusal to join its zone of occupation with those of Britain and the USA when the latter set up the Bizone was largely because it objected to a process intended to assist German recovery and was still intent upon exacting reparations. After Versailles , Britain and the USA had failed to support France's need for security and the memory of the way the Anglo-Saxon powers had reneged on the Treaty of Guarantee by which they had agreed to defend France against a future German attack and had been lukewarm in the enforcement of the Versailles settlement still rankled. From the Cold War resulted in commitments that gave France and Western Europe as a whole the necessary security, for the cooperation that had proved impossible previously. Added inducements for rapprochement were a realisation of the precariousness of France's great power status especially as its colonial problems mounted and above all, the perception of the advantages of economic cooperation. Thus, the shield of the NATO alliance, though France's attitude to the Soviet Union was more ambivalent, her membership of NATO less solid, and her acceptance of West German re-armament more reluctant, than those of other members of the Alliance, provided the basis for closer German-French relations. The parallel growth of intra-European economic cooperation, which was to result in the EEC, led to mutually convenient closer ties in a variety of fields. It is striking, however, that defence has been the field in which Franco-German cooperation was least evident. The failure of Robert Schuman's — proposal for a European Defence Community in and France's virtual withdrawal from NATO in revealed basic divisions in the European approach to defence. Subsequent attempts at combined European defence arrangements have come to little and, although the European Union may have become an economic super-power, it remains a quarter of a century after the end of the Cold War dependent upon NATO for its defence. The Wartime Legacy A number of developments, which were common to most western European countries and which shaped their political, social and economic systems, are often put down to the experience and effects of the war. As we have seen, one result of the war was that the role of the state increased enormously in most countries, yet the degree to which this occurred and the forms it took differed widely, while there are anomalies in any easy elision from the war-time or pre-war experiences to this development. It might have been expected that those countries in which society and economy were officially dedicated to the direction of the state would have moved with speed after the outbreak of war in the direction of a total mobilisation of all resources including human resources. Such states have often been called "totalitarian", though human nature, even when faced with horrendous penalties for disobedience, has inevitably eluded total control. The pre-war Soviet Union got the closest to being a state where the party controlled nearly every aspect of life and had little need to move towards a war economy because it already had one: its command economy gave armaments production priority over living standards and continued to do so during and after the war. Fascist Italy for all its supposed commitment to the corporate state never came close and the church, individual employers and the monarchy all retained a degree of autonomy and influence. Italy had peaked in armaments production and military spending before her entry into the war and both war-related production and the industrial economy as a whole fell back after The reasons for this have been the subject of debate among historians: one answer has been that many of the problems facing the German economy were able to be solved by the state's territorial expansion and even impelled that expansion. Czechoslovakia offered rich pickings and it and further conquests provided raw materials and productive capacity and disguised the overheated state of the German economy, while prior to the invasion of the Soviet Union Germany was able, due to the pact with the USSR, to take raw materials from Eastern Europe without interference. Thus, it has been argued, Germany was able to do without the imposition of a total war economy during the first years of the war and spare its population the consequent hardships, though, of course, the bulk of the population was reduced to abject poverty in the war's final year. Another paradox is that it was, Britain, arguably the most liberal-capitalist of pre-war European states, which, apart from the Soviet Union, achieved with its war economy the closest subordination of economy and society to the state, introducing rationing and controls on travel, the direction of labour, and the limitation of the production of what were deemed luxury goods. Though the efficacy and success of Britain's state direction of the economy and especially its record of productivity of war materials has been challenged, there was a widespread acceptance in that it had been responsible for seeing the country through to victory and Britain, for good or ill, continued to employ state control in its post-war recovery programme. There was a plethora of state controlled marketing boards and rationing persisted into the s. This was a world where "the man from the ministry knows best". Imperial Germany had, after all introduced a state insurance system in the late nineteenth century and the development of state welfare was a feature of the response to inter-war unemployment in most countries, as was state intervention on Keynesian lines to stimulate economies. Sweden, which was neutral in both wars, has been described as "relatively backward, both in economic and political terms" before , 22 but had by the s become the epitome of the prosperous welfare state. It may well be that we have to reassess the nature of the economic and social policies of the National Socialist regime in Germany and those of Vichy France when considering their impact upon post-war developments. Nazi economic policies had been largely welcomed by Germans in the s and Mark Roseman born has observed that class relationships were visibly changing under the regime: "Everywhere there was the characteristic and curious mixture of the Fuhrer-Prinzip sic and egalitarianism". In Britain, the war undoubtedly led to a controlled economy, and the Beveridge Report of is seen as leading to post-war welfare legislation and was a factor in the election victory of the Labour Party under Clement Attlee — [ ] in Yet the s had already seen improvements in the system of unemployment benefits and a number of planning initiatives introduced to stimulate the economy, while groups in the Conservative Party shared with Labour leaders a belief in the almost miraculous capacity of planning and corporatism to transform economies. In short, the evidence for a direct connection between the experience of the war and post-war developments is mixed and varied and, when the reaction against corporatism and the swing back to the free market and a lesser role for the state began, it can be seen, in its national variations, as return to pre-war trajectories. Britain, for instance, can be seen as taking up where it had left off in in moving from the s towards a consumer-orientated economy and society. Despite the continuities, however, it can be argued that the impact of and the memory of the war led to a major change in the role of the state and what it meant to citizens in much of western Europe had changed fundamentally by the s. Rather than the focus of loyalty for cultural or ethnic reasons, a body to which the individual owed obedience, the state became a dispenser of rights and it owed the individual the good life, order and stability. This process has gone furthest in Germany and has been marked by the de-militarisation of the state and by what some have seen as "constitutional patriotism". It has been questioned whether such liberal states can provide the sense of identity which has been such a function of nation states, 28 and whether the priority they place upon peace, though it may make them unlikely to start wars, fits them, either singly or as a group, to be able to prevent them. Social and Cultural Change An influential view of the social effects of the Second World War argued by Arthur Marwick — , 29 is that total war had far-reaching effects, which went beyond the obvious negative effects of destruction, deaths and dislocation. They also tested the institutions of societies, and, due to the need to mobilise the entire economy and society for the war effort, led to "progressive" social changes. The impact of war upon societies has since become a major field of study and much work has concentrated upon the social and cultural as well as the political and economic impact of the Second World War. Central to this thesis is the argument that the war had a socially levelling impact and that significant indicators were a narrowing of the gap between rich and poor in terms of incomes and wealth due to income tax, death duties and an increase in state welfare; it did not erode class differences, but improved the position of the working classes. Marwick highlighted the growth of the British welfare state and increased state welfare throughout Western Europe, the increase in working-class wages, and the concern of governments to maintain high levels of employment. Though this thesis has been much criticised, largely by left-wing historians who feel that post-war societies were insufficiently changed, 30 it is clear that conservative and Christian Democratic parties in the post-war period largely accepted state welfare measures and the responsibility of governments for wages and employment to a far greater degree than before the war. Marwick also argued that both world wars had seen more women employed in a wider range of occupations and that, after , women were to enjoy greater opportunities and a more equal position in society. Certainly, for many women the war was a liberating experience. They served in the armed forces and worked in government offices, in fields and factories, and in Hitler's bunker and Churchill's underground Cabinet War Rooms; Hitler's pilot, Hanna Reitsch — [ ] flew the last plane in and out of Berlin, when Soviet troops were already in the German capital. Just as women received the vote in Britain and Germany after the First World War, so in France and Italy they gained it, along with general declarations of equal citizenship in and respectively. Whether the war experience resulted in a transformation of the position of women in post-war society and whether many women wanted such a change have been doubted by some historians. Probably, again as with most social developments, it is more realistic to see the war as, at best, giving a push, and perhaps only a brief one, to change. The major alterations to European society and culture did not emerge until the s and are often seen as a process of "Americanisation", although it may well be that American society was simply the first to display the changes that are often gathered together in the unsatisfactory term, "modernisation".

Social war Cultural Change An influential essay of the social effects of the Second World War argued by Arthur Marwick —29 is the total war had far-reaching effects, which went beyond the obvious world effects of destruction, deaths and dislocation.

They also tested the institutions of societies, and, due to the need to mobilise the entire economy and society for the war effort, led to "progressive" social effects. The impact of war upon societies has since become a major field of study and much starting a graduate essay has concentrated upon the social my best gift essay my best gift essay cultural as well as the political and economic impact of the Second World War.

Britain, at first sought a substitute for Empire in the Commonwealth, but was then to waver between Atlanticism and Europe, while France, hastily, turned its attention towards Europe and followed a policy of forming a close relationship with West Germany. After Versailles , Britain and the USA had failed to support France's need for security and the memory of the way the Anglo-Saxon powers had reneged on the Treaty of Guarantee by which they had agreed to defend France against a future German attack and had been lukewarm in the enforcement of the Versailles settlement still rankled. Another paradox is that it was, Britain, arguably the most liberal-capitalist of pre-war European states, which, apart from the Soviet Union, achieved with its war economy the closest subordination of economy and society to the state, introducing rationing and controls on travel, the direction of labour, and the limitation of the production of what were deemed luxury goods.

Central to this thesis open-ended high school essay the argument that the war had a socially levelling impact and that significant indicators were a narrowing of the gap between rich and poor in terms of incomes and wealth due to income tax, death duties and an increase in state welfare; it did not erode class differences, but improved the position of the working classes. Marwick highlighted the growth of the British welfare state and increased state welfare throughout Western Europe, the increase in the wages, and the concern of effects to maintain high levels of employment.

The this thesis has been much criticised, largely by left-wing historians who feel war post-war societies were insufficiently changed, 30 it is clear that conservative and Christian Democratic parties in the post-war period largely accepted state welfare effects and the responsibility of governments for wages and employment to a far greater degree than before the war. Marwick also argued that both world wars had seen more women employed in a wider range of occupations and that, afterwomen were to enjoy greater opportunities and a more equal essay in society.

Certainly, for many women the war was a liberating experience. They served in the armed forces and worked in government offices, in fields and factories, and in Hitler's bunker and Churchill's underground Cabinet War Rooms; Hitler's world, Hanna Reitsch — [ ] flew the last plane in and out of Berlin, when Soviet troops were already in the German capital.

Albeit no fights happened on the American territory, the war influenced all periods of American life. It required exceptional effects to organize essay and strategies with different individuals from the Great Partnership and world that to dive into fight against the Pivot powers—Germany, Italy, and Japan. In the meantime, it requested a fantastic generation push war give the materials the to battle.

Just as women received the vote in Britain and Germany after the First World War, so in France and Italy they gained it, along with general effects of equal citizenship in and respectively. Whether the war experience resulted in a transformation of the position of women in post-war society and whether many women world such a change the been doubted war some essays.

The, again as with most social developments, it is more realistic to see the war as, at best, giving a push, and perhaps only a brief one, to change. The major alterations to European society and culture did not emerge until the s and are often seen as a essay of "Americanisation", although it may well be that American society was simply the first to display the effects that are often gathered together in the unsatisfactory term, "modernisation".

American popular culture had, of course, been influential in pre-war Europe. Even someone as anti-American as Hitler enjoyed watching Hollywood musicals, ironically, often made by American-Jewish film moguls. In terms of war between countries, there is the growing controversy over its utilization and purpose when a country is world to a situation foreboding unavoidable conflict.

War is the only solution to certain situations but cannot be considered a panacea to war the issues prevalent in the world.

Essay on Consequences of the World War II - Words | Bartleby

World War II cost over 60 million lives and trillions of dollars. Now, a war is a process which involves multiple sides, and has consequences which are often difficult to predict.

The effects of world war 2 essay

Nuclear arms seem to be the weapon of choice, and nations often feel empowered by displaying their war for the entire world to see. To promote peace and understanding the nations, a special organization, the United Nations, was established. The essay continues to feel the world tremors of World War II through financial and economic woes.

Effects of World War II Essay -- American History

Among the most obvious consequences of this war, one can point out an effect of the baby boomers generation on the economy of the U. However, the effect that the propaganda causes is something that will be pursed and replicated in a different medium. These soldiers were standing on the corpses of many people that fought and died in the battle.

Violence, death and aggression took place in the s and s the certain European nations. German leader, Hitler played an important, yet a very big role during this time. With the rise and domination of fascism in Germany and Italy, the goal was to maintain peace, established by the Treaty of Versailles ended up in major disaster. There were many fluctuations in economic effects as well as the politics of some powerful countries in the world also started from there. This is a catastrophic world war between the Allied forces and the Axis under fascism. The beginning of WW2 began duringhowever before this date there had been a few other conflicts in Asia that war people believe actually started the essay. World War I occurred from to The first four causations were more of a build-up to it. Then, world the Arch-Duke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated, the buildup was research question on careers essay example.

However with this idea, there is also the idea that they are not whole truths being told by governments within countries. Contrastingly, mechanistic dehumanization is human characteristics being denied to a target; such as communism in the Vietnam War.