Can You Use A Swear Word In An Essay Title

Deliberation 23.08.2019

curse words in essay? — College Confidential

The BBC felt bound to apologise. A conversation reported in one of John Pilger's books, Bowers says, gives a good example of how word forms, rather than their meanings, affect how we think and act.

It has been known for a while that people fluent in two languages respond far less strongly to swear words in their mother tongue than in their second language. But a new study of people's reactions to a "bad" swear word — fuck, for example — compared a euphemism that they understood to mean the same thing, now suggests our strong emotional reactions to swear words happen as a result of early verbal conditioning, rather than the meaning that is conveyed. This raises the possibility that young children may note their parents' reactions to taboo words before they understand what the words mean. All sorts of emotions are associated with the sound of swear words as we are growing up, says Jeff Bowers at the University of Bristol, who carried out the research. The results of his study, Bowers says, throw some light on a question often debated by linguists and psychologists: do the words you say affect the way you think and perceive the world? Bowers wired volunteers up to a machine that would assess their stress levels by measuring their sweat. He then asked them to say swear words and their euphemisms aloud. Even though everyone involved had volunteered for the study and was fully briefed as to what was involved, and therefore presumably not likely to be offended, participants showed higher stress levels when they were asked to swear than when asked to state the common euphemism. Bowers says the difference in stress levels between swear words and euphemisms shows that we don't only respond to the meaning of a swear word. But there are other, more sinister words. Words that have been used, historically, to shame, abuse, and marginalize others. It can be difficult to report difficult words. Do you remove it from coverage to avoid further offense? Or is it instructive? Ultimately, the controversy spawned the global SlutWalk movement, which is meant to protest unfair treatment of women and rape culture. Usually, they will annoy rather than shock. But if you do use them, spell them out in full, without asterisks. Often, online publications like the Huffington Post and BuzzFeed allow you to spell out profanity in the text, but stick to asterisks in headlines. In those cases, use an asterisk in place of a letter e. Traditional print newspapers and consumer magazines, on the other hand, as well as specific niche markets family publications, for example may require you to be more buttoned up. But what about your personal voice? Many novice writers feel the need to inject their fiction with the harshest of expletives to communicate a mood or to represent the character and that character's situation as authentically as possible. There are two problems with this approach. First, it's lazy. There are other ways, better ways, to communicate mood, character, and setting to your reader. Second, it's incredibly off-putting to the reader. This is because swear words are not like other words; regardless of the context, swear words elicit an emotional response. Swearing and Emotional Responses People have emotional reactions to reading or hearing swear words. Even if they do not feel offended, their attention is caught by the use of a taboo word. In fact, swear words are so tied to emotion that many people with dementia still swear even if they struggle with other speech-related tasks. Some researchers postulate that this is because swear words are remembered in a different part of the brain than regular words. Interestingly, researchers have also suggested that the effect of swearing lessens the more one uses or is exposed to curse words. There are two things to take from this. First, the overuse of curse words can elicit an unintentional emotional response in your reader—one that might make them not want to continue reading. No matter how "gritty" you want your writing to be, you still want people to actually read it. Second, remember that saving swearing for a very important moment will be much more effective than sprinkling curses throughout your work. Say, for example, that you're writing a novel about a housewife who is having a breakdown.

At an arms fair, Pilger describes asking a salesman to describe how a cluster grenade works. It is state of the art, unique. What it does is discharge copper dust, very, very fine dust, so that the particles saturate the objective …''' What use that "objective"? Pilger swears that can at these events "have the greatest difficulty saying 'people' and you and 'maim'". It's doubtful there is any word in the minds of buyers or sellers about the function of weapons, notes Bowers.

This, he says, is a title example of how what you say — or what you find too excruciating to say — essays the way you think and act.

Can you use a swear word in an essay title

In demonstrating that taboo words can create a physiological effect, Bowers's study highlights how two words that mean the same thing can provoke different responses from us, and, he says, in terms of human relationships, how "subtle differences can make all the difference in the world".

But what about your personal voice? In terms of your voice in personal essays or other nonfiction writing, swearing comes with a whole other set of guidelines.

Books With Swear Words in the Titles ( books)

And do give these words some literary respect. Sometimes, fuck is the best word. And for the writer, she lays out the risks you face in this confusing atmosphere.

Profanity dangles before us both the chance for powerful connection with readers—a loyal audience that enjoys when you write passionately and let your crazy out. How great is that? But the flip side of that is risking appearing unprofessional in some markets, and even turning off some percentage of readers.

This, he says, is a perfect example of how what you say — or what you find too excruciating to say — affects the way you think and act. Now it's time to wrap the lesson up by discussing when it is okay and when it is abso-frickin'-lutely not okay to swear in your writing. Situation 1: You are hanging out with your best friend. A conversation reported in one of John Pilger's books, Bowers says, gives a good example of how word forms, rather than their meanings, affect how we think and act. We can talk about your own potty mouth later. Using the f-word in the first sentence of this article wasn't done for gratuitous effect.

I know, because I wound up on the wrong side myself. Is it wrong to try and adapt your voice to connect with a particular group or market? Not at all.

Can you use a swear word in an essay title

The important thing is not to force it. Swearing in Academic Writing Don't do it. Unless you are writing a thesis about the linguistics of swearing or quoting something else that contains swearing, there is no reason for the use of profanity in your academic writing.

Bowers wired volunteers up to a machine that would assess their stress levels by measuring their sweat. He then asked them to say swear words and their euphemisms aloud. Even though everyone involved had volunteered for the study and was fully briefed as to what was involved, and therefore presumably not likely to be offended, participants showed higher stress levels when they were asked to swear than when asked to state the common euphemism. Bowers says the difference in stress levels between swear words and euphemisms shows that we don't only respond to the meaning of a swear word. The furore in December last year when James Naughtie made an unfortunate slip of the tongue while introducing culture secretary Jeremy Hunt on the Today programme demonstrates his point. After the slip-up went out live on air at breakfast-time, the BBC was inundated with complaints. Presumably nobody imagined the presenter had intended to use the c-word, but many were still so shocked that they called, wrote and emailed to tell the broadcaster of their dismay. The BBC felt bound to apologise. A conversation reported in one of John Pilger's books, Bowers says, gives a good example of how word forms, rather than their meanings, affect how we think and act. At an arms fair, Pilger describes asking a salesman to describe how a cluster grenade works. It is state of the art, unique. What it does is discharge copper dust, very, very fine dust, so that the particles saturate the objective …''' What was that "objective"? Pilger observes that salesmen at these events "have the greatest difficulty saying 'people' and 'kill' and 'maim'". It's doubtful there is any confusion in the minds of buyers or sellers about the function of weapons, notes Bowers. It can be difficult to report difficult words. Do you remove it from coverage to avoid further offense? Or is it instructive? Ultimately, the controversy spawned the global SlutWalk movement, which is meant to protest unfair treatment of women and rape culture. Usually, they will annoy rather than shock. But if you do use them, spell them out in full, without asterisks. Often, online publications like the Huffington Post and BuzzFeed allow you to spell out profanity in the text, but stick to asterisks in headlines. In those cases, use an asterisk in place of a letter e. Traditional print newspapers and consumer magazines, on the other hand, as well as specific niche markets family publications, for example may require you to be more buttoned up. But what about your personal voice? In terms of your voice in personal essays or other nonfiction writing, swearing comes with a whole other set of guidelines. And do give these words some literary respect. Sometimes, fuck is the best word. And for the writer, she lays out the risks you face in this confusing atmosphere. Profanity dangles before us both the chance for powerful connection with readers—a loyal audience that enjoys when you write passionately and let your crazy out. How great is that? But the flip side of that is risking appearing unprofessional in some markets, and even turning off some percentage of readers. I know, because I wound up on the wrong side myself. Is it wrong to try and adapt your voice to connect with a particular group or market?

I know—school is boring. Swearing in Personal Correspondence How you talk to your friends is your business, but keep this in mind: something that is intended as light-hearted or humorous can easily come off as harsh and mean when in writing, and adding profanity can be a sure way to cause miscommunication. Consider these two similar situations.

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Situation 1: You are hanging out with your best friend. She admits that she has forgotten her mother's birthday. You laugh, but in a way that seems understanding, not judgemental.

Should You Swear? 4 Things for Writers to Consider

You then say, jokingly, "Oh my god, what the hell is wrong with you? Situation 2: You are texting your best friend. Her: I forgot my mom's birthday!

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Ultimately, the controversy spawned the global SlutWalk movement, which is meant to protest unfair treatment of women and rape culture. There are other ways, better ways, to communicate mood, character, and setting to your reader. Is this particularly sensitive language? Many novice writers feel the need to inject their fiction with the harshest of expletives to communicate a mood or to represent the character and that character's situation as authentically as possible. This raises the possibility that young children may note their parents' reactions to taboo words before they understand what the words mean.

You: omg what the hell is wrong with you? She becomes offended because she thinks you are serious, though you really did intend it lightheartedly. She gets mad at you.

There are two problems with this approach. We can talk about your own potty mouth later. But she has such a strong reaction to the word that she cannot bring herself to utter it. Is this particularly sensitive language? All sorts of emotions are associated with the sound of swear words as we are growing up, says Jeff Bowers at the University of Bristol, who carried out the research. Swearing in Personal Correspondence How you talk to your friends is your business, but keep this in mind: something that is intended as light-hearted or humorous can easily come off as harsh and mean when in writing, and adding profanity can be a sure way to cause miscommunication.

You spend the next 20 minutes texting, trying to convince her that you were joking. You now have to take her out for dinner tomorrow to try to mend her hurt feelings.

Can you use a swear word in an essay title